FINE ART LANDSCAPES

Landscape Photography Submarine
Grist Mill
Cherry Blossoms
Big Dipper Eastern Oregon
Oceanside HDR
Late Summer
Transition
Porland Nightscape
Milky Way
Crater Lake
Hanalei Bay
Landscape Photographer I Kauai Hawaii
Hanalei Bay Full
Summer

My first love in photography when I first got a digital camera in 2004 and my first interest was inlandscape photography. There’s something about getting out in nature with the challenge of capturing some of the amazing beauty. It's a great activity to do with friends and I love the quiet and stillness of waiting for the perfect moment for the shot, scoping out an area for the best vantage point and then seeing the way that the light changed a scene over a few hours.

Here are a few of my favorite scenes:

Water 

The water can be the center of interest in the image, or it can serve as an element in your composition—as a diagonal or other leading line, as a horizontal line, or as a shape that complements other elements in the frame.

Reflections are always wonderful to photograph. You can use some reflections to enhance the image—the colors of reflected autumn leaves, for instance.  Use a polarizing filter to eliminate some of the reflection and increase contrast; rotate it until you have the effect you want.

Forests

Photographing forests presents a different set of challenges. First, think about the character of the forest you want to shoot and the feeling you want to convey in your image. As with any photograph, find a point of interest. It might be one slightly different tree trunk, a path winding through, or a splash of color on a flowering vine. Whatever it is, compose in such a way to lead the viewer to it.Whether you are shooting toward a forest or shooting from inside it, look for patterns, lines, and other compositional elements you can use. Try both wide and telephoto lenses. A wide lens looking up at the trees will make them soar; a telephoto will compress a row of trunks. Lie down and look straight up through the branches; climb a tree to look down the path.

Open Spaces

Wide-open spaces such as plains and prairies are among the hardest landscapes of all to photograph well because often they lack an obvious point of interest. Look for an element peculiar to that place and use it as a point of interest that says something about the scene and imparts a sense of scale. You don't want the viewer's eyes to wander —a winding road, a stream, or a fence line, for example.

Like every forest, every plain has its own personality, so hunt around until you have found an angle and composition that reflect it. What is the most important feature of this particular place? Think about the sky. Do you want a lot or a little of it? A clear blue sky might best reflect the character of one plain, a brewing storm another. Remember the rule of thirds. If the sky is important, place the horizon along the bottom third division of the frame.